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Four videos today, this weekend I’m going to shoot some more.

Pressing and prep for the sleeve seam allowances

 

Pressing the seam allowance with a seam roll when the sleeve is too narrow for the board.

Sewing in the lining at the top of the sleeve.

Hand sewing the bottom of the sleeve shut.

 

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Marking the eyelets out for spiral lacing

Cutting out the sleeves (the wool is from my stash and the wrinkles would not steam out)

First pass of sewing the sleeves together.

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Sewing in the lining around the top edge

Clipping into corners and trimming

Edge stitching the seam allowance to the lining along the top

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Pleating the skirt down with knife pleats and a box pleat in the back

 

Basting the pleats in place

Ironing the pleats down to keep things from moving around when I sew the skirt to the bodice

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Lucas DeHeere sketchbook #71 English women

“Yeah, we look Awesome and Swag!”

It has been 3 or 4 (mumble) years since I was going to do the kirtle sew-along. Life, family medical issues and changes got in the way.  My skill set has improved, how I break down projects has improved, but that does not mean I’m not still learning.

So I set up the video camera, I balanced my tripod on the printer that-may-work-but-I-really-just-use-it-as-a-scanner, shoved my social anxiety into a box and hit record.

I’m making kirtles. I’m making several kirtles that I plan to donate to Much Ado about Sebastopol. I don’t think I will get them all done in time for this years run, but there is always next year. If they get used, or auctioned off in a fundraiser, or end up in a school theater closet that is fine.

I have several yards of wool, pattern blocks, and a chunk of time to make something out of it all.

The playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTne9pSn75A&list=PL-5opaHvhlOkbr8K8buX1OpZm_4kHPPgU

The first three videos:

 

 

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Pattern Adjustments and Mock-ups

To me this is the annoying and tedious part of sewing, but once it is done we will have a bodice pattern that fits and we can use for various projects. If you already have a block pattern by all means use it. I’m starting from the beginning because this is stuff I wish I knew when I was starting out.

Materials:

Pencil
A small scrap of cardboard
Tape
Measuring tape
A long Ruler
Paper to trace your pattern on
Muslin or calico for Mock-up(s)
Scissors
Narrow Elastic or Ribbon
Tracing Wheel (optional)
A pin

Measurements:

To start we need a few measurements, so take a second to change into a fitted knit top and if you wear extra support under your garb put that on too. I’m wearing modern jeans to show where where your waist is not.

Natural  waist: ________ Take string or narrow elastic and tie it snug around your waist, wiggle around from side to side till it settles.  Make sure it isn’t twisted like mine is. This trick for finding the waist doesn’t always work, so a second way of finding it is to look at where your elbow falls, that will roughly tell you where your true waist is. (Thank you Elizabethan Costume facebook group for teaching me that proportional trick.)

Read the rest of this entry »

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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A Kirtle Sew Along

Awesome Banner to use if you are playing along! Just have it link to: http://centuries-sewing.com/category/kirtle-sew-along/

So I posted about this on Facebook and on the Renn. costume forum but forgot to post about it here. Opps.

I’ve made a lot of kirtles, in various ways, with various materials and stiffening. I’ve also answered a lot of questions about kirtles, and while I will be the first to tell you I’m not the end all be all fount of kirtle information, I have learned a great deal about them.

I’ve decided to host a kirtle sew along, and go step by step on how I make a basic 16th century kirtle. This will help people just starting out, middle of the road sewers and maybe the experts will pick up a few tricks. I’m going to be posting in a mixture of photos, written instructions and if the weather cooperates, video.

I’m not going to hand sew this one, I tend to use the sewing machine where it will not show and hand finish the parts that will.

Kirtle Sew Along Materials

Wool! Twill! Calico! Linen!

General Materials needed:

I’m giving a rough idea in the amounts listed if you are taller than average or plan to heavily preshrink your fabrics add more yardage.

 

4 to 5 yards of wool

4 to 5 yards linen for lining or just 2 yards of linen if only lining the bodice and sleeves

1 to 2 yards of twill/drill/canvas for interlining

 2 to 4 yards muslin/calico for flatlining and mock ups

Matching embrodiery thread for eyelets

A roll of paper for patterning, or newspaper can work in a pinch..

Tracing wheel

Awl

Chalk

Hand sewing needles, pins and so forth.

Lacing strips for fitting.

Pattern:

simplicity pattern 3723

Simplicity pattern 3723

After much debate, I decided to use a store bought pattern as a base.  Not everyone has a fitted bodice block, nor does everyone have access to a printer to print one out, or a dress form for draping.

Simplicity 3723 and 2354 is a basic costume pattern in a good range of sizes, the “Pilgrim” dress  has waist darts and bust darts but no other fancy shaping so it is ideal for adapting. And in the U.S. with Halloween coming up they usually put the patterns on sale.

 

 

 

I’ll cover rotating out the darts, adapting the pattern to a curved front bodice, trouble shoot any fitting issues as best I can and any other things that might come up.

I haven’t worked with commercial patterns for a long time so this will be a refresher course for me.

We will be ignoring the pattern instructions, if you have a similar pattern in your stash, feel free to use it instead.

 

 

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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