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Lucas DeHeere sketchbook #71 English women

“Yeah, we look Awesome and Swag!”

It has been 3 or 4 (mumble) years since I was going to do the kirtle sew-along. Life, family medical issues and changes got in the way.  My skill set has improved, how I break down projects has improved, but that does not mean I’m not still learning.

So I set up the video camera, I balanced my tripod on the printer that-may-work-but-I-really-just-use-it-as-a-scanner, shoved my social anxiety into a box and hit record.

I’m making kirtles. I’m making several kirtles that I plan to donate to Much Ado about Sebastopol. I don’t think I will get them all done in time for this years run, but there is always next year. If they get used, or auctioned off in a fundraiser, or end up in a school theater closet that is fine.

I have several yards of wool, pattern blocks, and a chunk of time to make something out of it all.

The playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTne9pSn75A&list=PL-5opaHvhlOkbr8K8buX1OpZm_4kHPPgU

The first three videos:

 

 

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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This shall be here in a few weeks.

 

goldsariwithvelvetborder

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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D-PB1-2015 D-PB2-2015 D-PB3-2015

 

“I wanted to send a couple pics from the con….we were a HUGE hit!  We got so many compliments on our costumes and we had a lot of fun!!

Thanks again!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

Worn at Wizard World Comic Con.

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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PB finished dress PB belt with pearl drops close up PB belt with pearl drops Lacing tip end back and hand sewn eyelets Lacing tip end sleeves

 

Seven yards of crimson linen, 32 eyelets hand sewn with red buttonhole silk, and lots of sparkly bits. commissions

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Debra-PB-mockupfrontshot

 

Full mock-up of the “red riding gown” for a client, to be made in a medium weight scarlet linen.

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Some work in progress shots of a 16th century black linen doublet.

Doublet front basted and shaped.

Doublet front basted and shaped.

 

Under side of the doublet front, canvas and pad stitched wool

 

Under side of the doublet front, canvas and pad stitched wool.

Under side of the doublet back, more canvas and pad stitched wool.

Under side of the doublet back, more canvas and pad stitched wool.

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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I’m in need of a new underskirt or petticoat for my 16th century clothing. I’ve been using the same cotton broadcloth one I made back in 2005, for years now. It is serviceable, but it adds a lot of bulk at the waist and it isn’t very authentic in construction or materials.

So it is time to for a new one.

I have 3.5 yards of a lovely wine colored, lightweight worsted wool donated to me by Noel. (Thank you Noel! <3 )

I’ll be drafting the pattern on the fabric and  hand sewing the whole thing with linen thread.

 

wine red wool and thread

 

I’m working from the Spanish version of Alcega’s Book. The english translation is out-of-print and painfully expensive. I’m not a native nor fluent spanish speaker so google and a few other resources will be heavily used.

I’m using the translated chart of symbols from the tailors book into modern inches from the Curious Frau’s site.

Taking some inspiration from Other Andrew’s The Alcega Project.

And keeping in mind the information  of the Modern Maker has posted about his study of the patterns on his blog and on the Elizabethan Costume Facebook group.

 


 

Definition from “Nuevo diccionario portatil, espanol e ingles: compuesto segun los mejore…

Manteo: s, m : a church man’s cloke; a woman’s under petticoat.

Language is a fluid thing, always changing. The above definition is from 1728 far later than the 16th century. However even later dictionaries simply list it as a cloak or mantle. Context is key, when it is listed as Manteo de Muger, chances are it is a skirt.

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Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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I’m not post much as I’m getting married Nov. 1st! All the wedding stress and appointments and planning means not much sewing time.

I did manage to get this patterned and partly sewn up the past few weeks.

It still needs a slip, binding, and hem but at least it is no longer looking sad on my dressform.

 

Red and black sequined 1920's inspired dressDeep V back red and black sequined 1920's inspired dress

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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I’ve made three English Fitted Gowns based on the Tudor Tailor’s pattern so far, and with each one I’ve tweaked how I’ve put them together.

olive wool fitted english gown

Light weight worsted wool gown lined with linen rayon blend

English Gown Front View

Black Velvet “Mockado” Gown lined with cotton broadcloth

Market Woman side shot

Wool broadcloth blend lined with cotton broadcloth

Issue one: Sleeve Dimples

Fitted gown sleeve dimple

 

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Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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We all have wip projects somewhere in the back of the closet. In my case I’ve been working on this Lord of the Rings inspired elf gown for the past three years (at least) using fabric I’ve had in my stash for almost nine years.

But the end is near! I have some bead work to do on the belt and neckline, the cloak to figure out and the sash to hem but that is it. There is a plain white under dress that goes with it since the odd textured knit fabric I used is sheer, but it does not fit on the form.

 

Aqua Elf Dress with cloak

Aqua Elf Dress without cloak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aqua Elf Dress Fabric

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Starting off the New Year with finishing a big project!

More photos can be found on the Nonesuch costume page.

Market woman front shot Nonesuch map market woman

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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I have always liked Saxon Gowns, they have a different look from the French and English gowns of the early 16th century, they have interesting construction puzzles, and an excuse to use several yards of velvet and fancy fabric is always a good thing.

saxon gown fabrics, brown velveteen and jaquard

After going back and forth with a friend on just how these gowns were put together, looking at lots and lots of paintings, and seeing what other costumers have done I decided to make one for myself.

 

I picked up some brown velveteen for cheap along with some jacquard in a similar color and started plotting.

I started a pinterest board for Cranach styled gowns to get an overview of what style elements I wanted to incorporate.

I have always been fond of the tall collared styled gowns and I haven’t seen many of them recreated so that is what I set my sights on.

Cranach the Elder 1528, portrait of a young woman holding grapes and apples.

Cranach-1534-portraitofanoblewoman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I dug out my tall collared doublet pattern to use as a base for the bodice, this version of the patterns has a few issues so it would need a bit of adjustment to get things right.

fitted gown back collar wrinkles

One of the issues with my doublet pattern, too tall in the collar and the base of the neck is too wide.

Doublet pattern base

Doublet pattern base

I cut out a mock-up in muslin adjusted the collar and the back of the neck.

That basted in place I put it on my dress form and marked where the bust point fell on the form.

But when I tried the mock-up on, where I marked the bust point on the form, is not where my bust point is. This is important as I’m using the bust point as a marker for where the edge of the gowns fall.

 

 

So I marked on the mock-up where my bust point hit. This also gives me the basis for how wise the front gap will be in the finished gown. Once that was marked I trued up my edges and starting at the bust point flared the front out to form the collar, and I am left with a pretty good base for the gown bodice. The only thing left to adjust is the back collar.

Bust point to flared collar

Flaring the collar out, starting at the bust point

Saxon Gown bodice mock up1

Saxon Gown bodice mock-up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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It’s done, it’s done!

I finished the full Elizabethan ensemble (it does need some ruffs but that is for another day) for my friend’s birthday/Gift-mas/every other holiday in the world for the next 300 years. I am now going to sleep the sleep of the dead.

So starting with the bottom layers:

linen cotton blend shirt and cranberry wool petticoat

Linen/cotton blend shirt with reinforced french seams. Cranberry wool skirt with tucked hem, a pocket and fingerloop braided closing.

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Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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I finally finished off the jacket project I started a few months ago. Well, I guess I really started it when I made the scaling up patterns video. I didn’t make any huge changes to the pattern I scaled up, the measurements were close to mine and I wanted to see what I would end up with. I had this green wool in my stash for a few years now and I knew that was what it wanted to be. It then fought me every step of the way. This was going to be a nice soothing hand sewing project that I could take my time on and enjoy. That lasted for a few weeks until I realized I needed to unpick both sleeves and sleeve lining. I decided it could either sit in the corner until it behaved or I could switch to the sewing machine and get it done.

Done is good, done is a wonderful thing.

 

green wool elizabethan jacket front shot

 

So this is partly hand sewn, partly machine sewn with some hand finishing. In hindsight I should have done one more mock-up of the pattern to get everything super perfect but its a jacket and it works as a jacket.
The only changes I did to the pattern was to accommodate my ski slope shoulders and take the back seams in, and then take the back seams in even more, and raise the neckline to not quite doublet height.

Looking at it now I should let the back seams out a wee bit, I don’t have hooks and eyes in yet so there is some puckering where I pinned it shut. The only other change I might do is bring the armscye forward a little bit more.

The extra poof at the back of the sleeve lets me reach forward and up and back with no horrible pulling.

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Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

centuriessewing: (Fitted English Gown)
Nicolas_de_Neufchâtel - Susanna Stefan

Nicolas_de_Neufchâtel – Susanna Stefan (died 1594), wife of Wolff Furter (1538? – 1594) of Nuremberg, National Gallery London

I have a confession to make, I am not a huge fan of pink. It is a fine color and I can wear it without looking ill but in my day-to-day life it is rather absent.

Yet a  great deal of my costumes and historical clothing however are pink. I didn’t really notice it at first, until someone suggested that I should make the pink gown in the Neufchatel painting.

Then I noticed, I did have at least 3 or 4 gowns that were pink.  Be it by fate, or accident, of the by-product of digging through the clearance rack and looking for something useable.

I’ve found silk on sale, it was pink, I found a linen blend that was pink. I also managed to some how color match the linen to wool bought half a year later from a different store. I’ve tossed tables cloths and tan fabric into a scarlet and wine dye bath and they too all ended up some shade of pink.

Rose, Salmon, Cranberry, Azalea, Raspberry. Or more Elizabethan names, Maiden’s Blush, Carnation, Lusty Gallant.


The color is haunting me or hunting me with every project I make.

I resisted at first, maybe I could make it in a different color? Yet most of the fabric in my stash is already set aside for other projects, and I realized I picked up the perfect scrap of velvet for the gown trim a week ago.

I found a damaged silk blend sari for cheap, it should get here in a few weeks. Until then I have time to plan and plot. This is not my usual area of sewing, I usually stick to England and Spain. I’ve read a ton of dress diaries over the years so I know a few bits of terminology but I may get something things mixed up.  I have a black velvet purse I could use for the bust band (brustfleck?) that has bullion embroidery on it, or I have a few other ideas on how to make something similar.

A few details from the painting:

Neufchatel-detail-smock
Neufchatel-detail-waist
Neufchatel-detail-brustfleck

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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The pink linen kirtle I made for a friend made its début last weekend. Linen/rayon blend soft bodice with handmade eyelets. It has sleeves but it was way too hot for them. Over all I am pleased the next version in green wool will need very little tweaking.

 

 

After a long day at faire

 

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Time for round two with the jacket mock-up!

 

Margaret Layton's Jacket fitted down from the front

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Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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I finally got around to making a mock-up of the jacket pattern I scaled up last year. I thought it would be fun to see the jacket straight from the scaled up pattern on a body. I’m wearing it over my Elizabethan shirt, kirtle and red petticoat, it is just pinned and basted together in the photos. I’m a wee bit smaller than Margaret, so I will need to do some fitting along the side back seams and along the sleeves, she had much longer arms than I.

 

MLayton Jacket Mockup1 Front

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Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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Since getting The Queen’s Servant’s I’ve been coveting the pointed hood with a sort of fiendish glee, it also might be an under layer to the strange headdress in Holbein the Younger’s drawing.

A month ago I scaled up the pattern and made a mock-up. It was huge, it devoured my head. I have a normal size head, but the hat made it look like a peanut.

Not the look I want. Just no.

Thinking perhaps I scaled it up wrong I set about slashing the pattern and scaling it down to no avail. I took in the mock-up 3 or 4 times before toss it in the corner.

It was Franken-hood. I don’t have any photos of the monstrosity.

Tonight I decided to try it again, I took 3 or 4 measurements and scaled the pattern up to my head depth and jaw level.

 

The red line shows where I pinned along the seam line.

 

It wasn’t bad, but I wasn’t happy with the shape in the back, it didn’t look cute, it looked like I had a copernican attached to my bun.

 

Tudor hood mockup adjustments

The green line shows what needs to be tweaked.

Much cuter. But something niggled at the back of my mind. Why was the scaled up pattern from the book so big? I went back and looked at the scale ratio and reread the instructions, then I noticed the little line drawing on the side. The round hood had the front folded back. This wasn’t mentioned anywhere in the book, and it is hard to see from the photos when everything is black velvet on black velvet.

So I scaled up the original pattern again.

Tudor Hood Pattern Comparison

Another round of pinning and I have this when I fold back the front edge and let it form the frontlet.

Tudorhood-3.0-folded-back

The yellow line shows the depth of the fold.

Much much better. The simple version in the book doesn’t look like it is worn with a separate frontlet, so I am going to use the frontlet pattern as a facing for the turn back portion of the hood.

Originally published at Centuries Sewing: Historical Costumes and Clothing. You can comment here or there.

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